Diet change - a solution to reduce water use ?

dc.contributorAalto-yliopistofi
dc.contributorAalto Universityen
dc.contributor.authorJalava, Mikaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKummu, Mattien_US
dc.contributor.authorPorkka, Miinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSiebert, Stefanen_US
dc.contributor.authorVaris, Ollien_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Built Environmenten
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T13:37:39Z
dc.date.available2017-11-21T13:37:39Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.descriptionVK: T20702
dc.description.abstractWater and land resources are under increasing pressure in many parts of the globe. Diet change has been suggested as a measure to contribute to adequate food security for the growing population. This paper assesses the impact of diet change on the blue and green water footprints of food consumption. We first compare the water consumption of the current diets with that of a scenario where dietary guidelines are followed. Then, we assess these footprints by applying four scenarios in which we gradually limit the amount of protein from animal products to 50%, 25%, 12.5% and finally 0% of the total protein intake. We find that the current water use at the global scale would be sufficient to secure a recommended diet and worldwide energy intake. Reducing the animal product contribution in the diet would decrease global green water consumption by 6%, 11%, 15% and 21% within the four applied scenarios, while for blue water, the reductions would be 4%, 6%, 9% and 14%. In Latin America, Europe, Central and Eastern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, diet change mainly reduces green water use, while in the Middle East region, North America, Australia and Oceania, both blue and green water footprints decrease considerably. At the same time, in South and Southeast Asia, diet change does not result in decreased water use. Our results show that reducing animal products in the human diet offers the potential to save water resources, up to the amount currently required to feed 1.8 billion additional people globally; however, our results show that the adjustments should be considered on a local level.en
dc.description.versionPeer revieweden
dc.format.extent1-14
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.identifier.citationJalava, M, Kummu, M, Porkka, M, Siebert, S & Varis, O 2014, ' Diet change - a solution to reduce water use ? ', Environmental Research Letters, vol. 9, no. 7, 074016, pp. 1-14 . https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/074016en
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/074016en_US
dc.identifier.issn1748-9326
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 92ee7053-ee40-4aa2-876f-b4a46adc5e25en_US
dc.identifier.otherPURE ITEMURL: https://research.aalto.fi/en/publications/92ee7053-ee40-4aa2-876f-b4a46adc5e25en_US
dc.identifier.otherPURE LINK: http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/9/7/074016/articleen_US
dc.identifier.otherPURE FILEURL: https://research.aalto.fi/files/15848352/Jalava_2014_Environ._Res._Lett._9_074016.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://aaltodoc.aalto.fi/handle/123456789/28829
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:aalto-201711217650
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERSen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 9, issue 7en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.keywordblue wateren_US
dc.subject.keyworddieten_US
dc.subject.keywordfood supplyen_US
dc.subject.keywordgreen wateren_US
dc.subject.keywordsustanabilityen_US
dc.subject.keywordwater consumptionen_US
dc.subject.keywordwater footprinten_US
dc.titleDiet change - a solution to reduce water use ?en
dc.typeA1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessäfi
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
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