Additive manufacturing processes in medical applications

dc.contributorAalto-yliopistofi
dc.contributorAalto Universityen
dc.contributor.authorSalmi, Mikaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineeringen
dc.contributor.groupauthorAdvanced Manufacturing and Materialsen
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-25T10:12:52Z
dc.date.available2021-01-25T10:12:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-03en_US
dc.description.abstractAdditive manufacturing (AM, 3D printing) is used in many fields and different industries. In the medical and dental field, every patient is unique and, therefore, AM has significant potential in personalized and customized solutions. This review explores what additive manufacturing processes and materials are utilized in medical and dental applications, especially focusing on processes that are less commonly used. The processes are categorized in ISO/ASTM process classes: Powder bed fusion, material extrusion, VAT photopolymerization, material jetting, binder jetting, sheet lamination and directed energy deposition combined with classification of medical applications of AM. Based on the findings, it seems that directed energy deposition is utilized rarely only in implants and sheet lamination rarely for medical models or phantoms. Powder bed fusion, material extrusion and VAT photopolymerization are utilized in all categories. Material jetting is not used for implants and biomanufacturing, and binder jetting is not utilized for tools, instruments and parts for medical devices. The most common materials are thermoplastics, photopolymers and metals such as titanium alloys. If standard terminology of AM would be followed, this would allow a more systematic review of the utilization of different AM processes. Current development in binder jetting would allow more possibilities in the future.en
dc.description.versionPeer revieweden
dc.format.extent16
dc.format.extent1-16
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.identifier.citationSalmi, M 2021, ' Additive manufacturing processes in medical applications ', Materials, vol. 14, no. 1, 191, pp. 1-16 . https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14010191en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ma14010191en_US
dc.identifier.issn1996-1944
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 64d5db7a-b9ad-44e7-af96-7bd13c453869en_US
dc.identifier.otherPURE ITEMURL: https://research.aalto.fi/en/publications/64d5db7a-b9ad-44e7-af96-7bd13c453869en_US
dc.identifier.otherPURE LINK: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85098775441&partnerID=8YFLogxKen_US
dc.identifier.otherPURE FILEURL: https://research.aalto.fi/files/55004811/ENG_Salmi_Additive_Manufacturing_Processes_Materials.pdfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://aaltodoc.aalto.fi/handle/123456789/102168
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:fi:aalto-202101251478
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMaterialsen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 14, issue 1en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subject.keyword3D printingen_US
dc.subject.keywordAdditive manufacturingen_US
dc.subject.keywordClinicalen_US
dc.subject.keywordDentalen_US
dc.subject.keywordImplantsen_US
dc.subject.keywordMedicalen_US
dc.subject.keywordMethodsen_US
dc.subject.keywordProcessesen_US
dc.subject.keywordRapid manufacturingen_US
dc.subject.keywordRapid prototypingen_US
dc.titleAdditive manufacturing processes in medical applicationsen
dc.typeA2 Katsausartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessäfi
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
Files