Mesolithic shadow play?

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Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
A1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä
Date
2022
Major/Subject
Mcode
Degree programme
Language
en
Pages
1–19
Series
Time and Mind, Volume 15, issue 1
Abstract
Throughout history, humans have told stories to one another. Although these stories have largely disappeared over the course of time, they have sometimes left material remains, for instance in the form of rock art. However, rock art might not be the only materialization of prehistoric storytelling practices. On the contrary, if made active again, other prehistoric artefacts might also bring past storytelling practices back to life. In this paper, we examine how storytelling might have taken place in Late Mesolithic Finland (c. 6800–5200 cal BC). As a case study, we investigate a zoomorphic wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) antler artefact from southern Finland, the so-called ‘Lepaa artefact’, with multidisciplinary methods arising from the traditions of experimental archaeology, 3D-technologies, and artistic research. As a result, we suggest that Mesolithic storytelling might have been entangled with ritual practices and accompanied by performances that resemble traditional shadow theatre.
Description
Keywords
Mesolithic archaeology, 3D-technologies, artistic research, ritual performance, mobile art, storytelling, Shadow theatre, photography, media art, multimedia
Other note
Citation
Ahola , M & Lassila , K 2022 , ' Mesolithic shadow play? Exploring the performative attributes of a zoomorphic wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) antler artefact from Finland ' , Time and Mind , vol. 15 , no. 2 , pp. 167-185 . https://doi.org/10.1080/1751696X.2022.2098047