Social network differences of chronotypes identified from mobile phone data

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dc.contributor Aalto-yliopisto fi
dc.contributor Aalto University en
dc.contributor.author Aledavood, Talayeh
dc.contributor.author Lehmann, Sune
dc.contributor.author Saramäki, Jari
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-10T10:35:58Z
dc.date.available 2018-12-10T10:35:58Z
dc.date.issued 2018-12-01
dc.identifier.citation Aledavood , T , Lehmann , S & Saramäki , J 2018 , ' Social network differences of chronotypes identified from mobile phone data ' EPJ Data Science , vol. 7 , no. 1 , 46 , pp. 1-13 . DOI: 10.1140/epjds/s13688-018-0174-4 en
dc.identifier.issn 2193-1127
dc.identifier.other PURE UUID: f7f66fbf-9b20-4402-a4e0-72e86a606527
dc.identifier.other PURE ITEMURL: https://research.aalto.fi/en/publications/social-network-differences-of-chronotypes-identified-from-mobile-phone-data(f7f66fbf-9b20-4402-a4e0-72e86a606527).html
dc.identifier.other PURE LINK: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055571611&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.identifier.other PURE FILEURL: https://research.aalto.fi/files/29456521/s13688_018_0174_4.pdf
dc.identifier.uri https://aaltodoc.aalto.fi/handle/123456789/35364
dc.description.abstract Human activity follows an approximately 24-hour day-night cycle, but there is significant individual variation in awake and sleep times. Individuals with circadian rhythms at the extremes can be categorized into two chronotypes: “larks”, those who wake up and go to sleep early, and “owls”, those who stay up and wake up late. It is well established that a person’s chronotype can affect their activities and health. However, less is known about the effects of chronotypes on social behavior, even though many social interactions require coordinated timings. To study how chronotypes relate to social behavior, we use data collected with a smartphone app on a population of more than seven hundred volunteer students to simultaneously determine their chronotypes and social network structure. We find that owls maintain larger personal networks, albeit with less time spent per contact. On average, owls are more central in the social network of students than larks, frequently occupying the dense core of the network. Theseresults point out that there is a strong connection between the chronotypes of people and the structure of social networks that they form. en
dc.format.extent 1-13
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.relation.ispartofseries EPJ Data Science en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Volume 7, issue 1 en
dc.rights openAccess en
dc.subject.other Modelling and Simulation en
dc.subject.other Computer Science Applications en
dc.subject.other Computational Mathematics en
dc.subject.other 113 Computer and information sciences en
dc.title Social network differences of chronotypes identified from mobile phone data en
dc.type A1 Alkuperäisartikkeli tieteellisessä aikakauslehdessä fi
dc.description.version Peer reviewed en
dc.contributor.department Department of Computer Science
dc.contributor.department Danmarks Tekniske Universitet
dc.subject.keyword Centrality
dc.subject.keyword Chronotype
dc.subject.keyword Mobile phone data
dc.subject.keyword Social networks
dc.subject.keyword Modelling and Simulation
dc.subject.keyword Computer Science Applications
dc.subject.keyword Computational Mathematics
dc.subject.keyword 113 Computer and information sciences
dc.identifier.urn URN:NBN:fi:aalto-201812106379
dc.identifier.doi 10.1140/epjds/s13688-018-0174-4
dc.type.version publishedVersion


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