Sustainability in Finland’s extractive industry: Responding to a need for best practice guidelines in early decision making phases

 |  Login

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Aalto-yliopisto fi
dc.contributor Aalto University en
dc.contributor.advisor Mäkinen, Jukka
dc.contributor.advisor Toivonen, Saija
dc.contributor.author Hooey, Kieran
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-17T12:55:12Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-17T12:55:12Z
dc.date.issued 2016-06-13
dc.identifier.uri https://aaltodoc.aalto.fi/handle/123456789/21065
dc.description.abstract Most of the world is in agreement that climate change is indeed real and it remains one of the most crucial unsolved problems in the 21st century. In Finland, much of the anger and blame was placed squarely on the shoulders of the extractive industry after a massive leakage of the gypsum tailings ponds at Talvivaara Mining Co in 2011. The purpose of this research is to uncover the central issues that the Finnish non-energy extractive industry must improve on to become more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable. An extensive literature review combined with 20 stakeholder interviews were conducted. The stakeholders are all very highly regarded members in the industry and come from a variety of backgrounds such as government, science/universities, industry, and non-governmental Indigenous organizations. The results of both methods were analysed and combined to create a wholesome list of 10 of the most crucial issues, called themes. The issues/themes that were raised the most in the stakeholder interviews were the need for sustainability to be considered in the exploration phase and that the non-energy extractive industry has lost the trust of stakeholders due to a lack of communication. The literature review also points to these areas as weak spots and insists that social and community engagement techniques must become more effective. These areas can be referred to as leverage points in systems thinking because improving them will have a large impact on the industry as a whole. Other issues include technological improvement, improving biodiversity conservation and protection, and water and tailings management. The study took a participatory research approach by having the interviewees/stakeholders review and make changes throughout the study by means of meetings, phone calls, and emails. During these consultations, several interviewees expressed the need to present the 10 themes in a visually appealing fashion or, they said, many decision makers would not read it. The results section was transcribed into a guidebook along with graphs and figures to create an easy to read document. The stakeholders have all agreed to distribute the guidebook to their contacts. Further research must be conducted with a larger, statistically valid sample size and also to determine how the themes can be best turned into positive actions. en
dc.format.extent 72 + 34
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.title Sustainability in Finland’s extractive industry: Responding to a need for best practice guidelines in early decision making phases en
dc.type G2 Pro gradu, diplomityö fi
dc.contributor.school Insinööritieteiden korkeakoulu fi
dc.subject.keyword sustainability en
dc.subject.keyword community engagement en
dc.subject.keyword exploration en
dc.subject.keyword non-energy mineral extraction en
dc.subject.keyword mining en
dc.subject.keyword natural stone en
dc.identifier.urn URN:NBN:fi:aalto-201606172673
dc.programme.major Creative Sustainability in Real Estate fi
dc.programme.mcode IA3026 fi
dc.type.ontasot Master's thesis en
dc.type.ontasot Diplomityö fi
dc.contributor.supervisor Viitanen, Kauko
dc.programme Master’s Degree Programme in Real Estate Economics fi


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search archive


Advanced Search

article-iconSubmit a publication

Browse